Daddy Dragon Saves The Day Picture Book Review

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Daddy Dragon Saves the DayThe dragons of Quace are a boisterous bunch, and this scaly family is home alone with Dad! How will he cope with the chaos? Will he ever work out how to un-singe a lawn? And hey! Is that a meteor on its way to ruin everything? He’s going to need all his mythical might to make sure that Mrs. Dragon doesn’t come home to a smoking crater instead of a house. Young readers will enjoy the ride as captivating colors and rip-roaring rhymes join forces in this playful tale of everyday domestic dragon life getting quite out of hand.

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This is the cutest picture book ever! I thought Bobby and the Monsters was cute, but this one definitely tops it.

Daddy Dragon is taking care of the kids as Mrs. Dragon is away at a meeting. He thinks that he is going to be able to handle taking care of the little ones, but they are definitely a handful. First, they tear up the house. Then, when Daddy Dragon tries to clean up the house, they destroy the yard. But soon, an asteroid is coming down from the sky towards the babies. They can’t destroy it, but Daddy Dragon swoops in, and saves the family. The children apologize for making such a mess, Mommy Dragon comes home, and everyone cleans together.

This book would be a perfect bedtime story. The moral of “no matter how “bad” you are, your parents will always be there for you” is an important one. It is also nice that the story didn’t just treat the children acting out and making a mess as “normal” or “cute” behavior. They apologized to their father in the end and realized that they shouldn’t have been acting out.

The art in this book is intricate yet simple. The dragons are all color-coded so kids would be able to draw them. Some of the pictures even look like they were drawn in a “crayon-ish” style. There were no super glossy-looking pages, even while reading the novel digitally. The pictures had duller colors and slightly rougher lines, looking like they were drawn with colored pencils or crayons. I am sure that any kid reading this book would be inspired to go draw themselves.

I would definitely recommend this book to anyone looking for an adorable children’s book about a dragon father and his kids.

I received this book and this is my voluntary review.

Overall Rating: 5 out of 5 books

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Bobby and the Monsters Review

“Bobby,” Mom said, “it’s time to sleep
and dream of things that are nice —
kittens and puppies, new toys, ice cream,
and pie, but just one slice!”

“But, Mom, I’m scared to go to sleep,
monsters are here every day.
One always makes a lot of noise
and never goes away.”

One evening Bobby confessed that he is afraid to sleep in his bed. It is a quite often situation for little kids. Their vivid imagination creates a genuine fear about what is waiting in the darkness of the room. Bobby’s Mom treats with understanding to his feelings and peculiarly calms him. She makes up a story that makes son smile and ready to sleep.

What is this story about? Just start to read, and you know it.

It is a cute little story will entertain children and make a good time with parents before sleep.

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This adorable picture book teaches children not to fear the monsters under the bed while still allowing their imaginations to grow. Rather than telling your child that there are no monsters under the bed, this book gives those monsters names! They don’t mean to trick you, they are just looking to play at night, and you can tell them that you are trying to sleep and they will go away. They are very playful creatures, not mean scary monsters trying to eat you.

I loved the illustrations in this short book. Even though the entire thing was only around 11 pages, I spent a lot of time looking at the detailed colorful monsters. Viktoriia Mykhalevych is the illustrator, and she did an amazing job. I felt the monsters come to life off the page from the cute rhymes and the unique drawings.

This book is just short enough that it could be a great bedtime story and is simple enough that a child learning to read would be able to read it on their own. Definitely a way to teach children to read while still allowing them to be entertained by the pictures. The pictures even fit perfectly onto my Kindle, meaning buying the book paperback or electronically will not change the overall experience.

I would definitely recommend this to anyone looking for a cute and colorful picture book to read.

I received a copy of this book and this is my voluntary review.

Overall Review: 5 out of 5 books

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Justice Gone Book Blitz

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Justice Gone cover.jpgJustice Gone

By N. Lombardi Jr

Genre: Legal Thriller

Justice Gone, a mystery/legal thriller which publishes February 22, 2019, touches upon many topical, controversial issues in today’s society as well as being a thrilling and engaging read. The story encapsulates current social issues: police brutality, homelessness, the plight of returning war veterans, the frenzy of the press, and the mechanics of the US judicial system.

“When a homeless war veteran is beaten to death by the police, stormy protests ensue, engulfing a small New Jersey town. Soon after, three cops are gunned down.

A multi-state manhunt is underway for a cop killer on the loose. And Dr. Tessa Thorpe, a veteran’s counselor, is caught up in the chase.

Donald Darfield, an African-American Iraqi war vet, war-time buddy of the beaten man, and one of Tessa’s patients, is holed up in a mountain cabin. Tessa, acting on instinct, sets off to find him, but the swarm of law enforcement officers gets there first, leading to Darfield’s dramatic capture.

Now, the only people separating him from the lethal needle of state justice are Tessa and ageing blind lawyer, Nathaniel Bodine. Can they untangle the web tightening around Darfield in time, when the press and the justice system are baying for revenge?”

Justice Gone is the first in a series of psychological thrillers involving Dr. Tessa Thorpe.

 

author pic N Lombardi.jpgAbout the Author

Lombardi Jr, the N for Nicholas, has spent over half his life in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, working as a groundwater geologist. Nick can speak five languages: Swahili, Thai, Lao, Chinese, and Khmer (Cambodian).

In 1997, while visiting Lao People’s Democratic Republic, he witnessed the remnants of a secret war that had been waged for nine years, among which were children wounded from leftover cluster bombs. Driven by what he saw, he worked on The Plain of Jars for the next eight years.

Nick maintains a website with content that spans most aspects of the novel: The Secret War, Laotian culture, Buddhism etc. http://plainofjars.net

His second novel, Journey Towards a Falling Sun, is set in the wild frontier of northern Kenya.

His latest novel, Justice Gone was inspired by the fatal beating of a homeless man by police.

Nick now lives in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Visit his Goodreads page: https://bit.ly/2D1Ktt5

Amazonhttps://amzn.to/2WCTodE

Barnes & Noblehttps://bit.ly/2SoiKwc

Facebookhttps://bit.ly/2sY7LeN

GIVEAWAY!!

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Author N. Lombardi Jr is giving away 20 signed copies of Justice Gone. Enter below!

Excerpt

Chapter 1

Bruntfield, New Jersey, just another banal town in a part of the country that nobody thinks about, was about to become famous; or rather, more aptly put, infamous. People sauntered past lackluster shops unaware that in a few days, the lackadaisical streets would bear the rabid frustrations that divided the nation; a pus-like bitterness that was held in check by the demands of everyday survival and the distractions offered by obsessive consumerism and brazen media.

Some would inevitably blame the cascade of events on the weather, since the origins could be found on a hot summer day in 2006. Sure, just about all summer days are hot, but this one was close to the record, and humid to boot. By the end of July, the Northeast coast was suffering under a sweltering heat wave. Despite the humidity, no one could remember the last time it had rained. A hundred-year drought was predicted, they’d said.

Bruntfield, among the many places under this curse, had its water supply so severely depressed that the city authorities were forced to impose water rationing. As if that wasn’t enough, the excessive load on air conditioners led to incessant brownouts. With the weather nothing less than insufferable, suffocating, oppressive, even provoking, tempers flared along with the temperature. But the local situation, as bad as it was, was about to get worse.

In the heart of this small town, just a block up from the bus depot, sat Sliders, a rather successful drinking establishment catering to young adults, and noted for its ecstasy-fueled rave parties. At four in the afternoon, the owner, Joe Poppet, a burly man with a thick red beard and a well-developed beer belly, was staring out the large glass facade of his bar.

“Screw this heat, man.”

Joe was sweating because he didn’t want to turn on the air-conditioning; as a rule, he didn’t put it on until a half hour before opening. He possessed a rather cynical personality, considering himself continually persecuted by life’s little aggravations. Now it was the heat ramping up his electricity bill; soon it would be the freezing temperatures inflating his heating bill…always something. His worries constantly exceeded his hopes. He was sort of a “glass-half-empty” man.

Rudy Glum, the shaven-headed bartender, was an easygoing optimist, a “glass-half-full” kind of guy. He was whistling as he washed the glasses in the sink behind the bar. “Tell me about it,” he chuckled. “I hear ya, buddy.”

But Rudy’s sanguinity did not rub off on Joe. “There’s that guy again.”

“What guy?”

“That fucking guy we saw yesterday.”

“Oh, yeah, he’s probably from the bus depot. Lotta homeless hang out there.”

Joe continued to stare out the glass facade, feeling helpless. “For Chrissakes, why can’t the city do something and get rid of those bastards. They’re a fucking eyesore…it’s bad for business. Probably got diseases too.”

Rudy finished drying the glass in his hand and hung it up on the beer mug rack. “Yeah, it’s a goddamn shame,” he said noncommittally, trying to get these glasses done before the evening crowd surged in.

“He doesn’t have a shirt on.”

“Yeah, well it’s hot, ain’t it? Wish I could take mine off.”

“And we’re opening in an hour. Ladies Night tonight.”

Rudy said nothing while reaching for another glass from the sink behind the bar.

“Call the cops.”

The bartender froze with the glass still in his hand. “And tell them what?”

“I don’t know, tell ‘em there’s someone suspicious hangin out on the corner…trying to break into cars or something. That way they’ll come fast.”

Reluctantly, Rudy put down his dishrag, picked up the phone, and dialed 911, not feeling good about it at all.

Vincent Van Gogh Book Blitz

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Vincent Van Gogh – The Ambiguity of Insanity

By Giuseppe Cafiero

Genre: Meta Literature       

Format: Audiobook

 

My main interest in the life of Vincent Van Gogh is in his humanity. In attempting to understand the man and his art, I have focused on the women and the places which played an essential part in his development. In my opinion, no previous biography has concentrated so specifically on these two factors, which I have used to provide the framework for my account.  

The women are presented as women of flesh and blood, certainly, but also in the roles of spiritual guides (Mrs Jones), mother figures (Kee Voss, Sien Hornik, Margot Begemann), or subjects for portraits (Mme Roulin and Mme Ginoux). Places, too, played a decisive part in the development of his character and art. Isleworth, Amsterdam, the Borinange, Arles, St. Remy, Auvers-sur-Oise witnessed and influenced Vincent’s attempts to capture colours, atmosphere and the effects of light.

Anyone interested in the tormented life of this extraordinary man is therefore bound to be fascinated by this account, which also draws out a further vital factor: Vincent’s obsessive determination to become a painter. It is impossible to understand the man without investigating the nature of his obessions.

Obsession was the subtle, tragic malady which slowly but inexorably consumed the man: the obsessive determination to express himself in colour and symbol; an obsession with redemption (seen in his mission to the Belgian miners of the Borinage and his relationship with Sien), an obsession with friendship (the failure of his relationship with Gauguin), his obsession with a self-tormenting spirituality (the relationship with his pastor father), with brotherly love (his relationship with Theo, which touches on the morbid), with the sun of the southern France (Arles and Auvers), and with death itself.

Powerless to intervene, we witness the long and painful progress towards his final suicide, heralded by the longing for extinction once madness (undoubtedly desired and loved as a means to silence his anguish) had proved a grievous companion and certainly not the source of hoped-for peace.

The work consists of ten chapters, each featuring a place and a woman who played an important part in Vincent’s life.

 

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About the Author

Giuseppe Cafiero lives in the Tuscan countryside, in Lucignano, in the province of Arezzo, Italy.

Born in Naples, he spent his childhood in several Italian cities. In Bologna he began to attend intellectual circles at Roberto Roversi ‘s renowned bookstore, “Palma Verde”.

It was in one of the magazines published by this cultural center, that the first part of “James Joyce – Rome and other stories” was first published.

He later worked for various radio producers, especially Radio Capodistria and the Italian Swiss Radio so he moved to Tuscany. Finally he was able to devote himself to reading and to pursue his literary work.

His main literary influence was Calvin, author of extraordinary literary intellectual subtlety and intelligence. Giuseppe Cafiero continuously reads Borges, another great sublime, inimitable author who also worshiped Joyce.

Giuseppe Cafiero has written renditions, free adaptations, reductions for the radio, translations from French. The spectrum of names is extensive, from Shakespeare to O’Neill, from Raspe to Daudet, from Toller to Brecht. He has written for thaetre and radio, collaborating also with the RAI, Radio Sveringes and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

But his strongest point is the “bio-fiction” as his book about Joyce in Rome, another published in 2008 about Vincent van Gogh, and one about Monsieur Gustave Flaubert in 2010. The three characters were revolutionary in their own field. Van Gogh, with his extraordinarily beautiful explosion of colors. Joyce, who broke with the literary realism of the 1800′s.

Due to his experience writing for radio, his books have a great handling of the language of his characters. This is the case of the program Giuseppe Cafiero wrote called ‘James Joyce in una notte in Valpurga’, in 1990, after which he ended the narrative fiction of Joyce’s stay in Rome in 1906 and 1907.

Visit www.giuseppecafiero.com

 

Amazon.com – https://www.amazon.com/Vincent-Van-Gogh-Ambiguity-Insanity/dp/B07M65GX3V

Audible.com – https://www.audible.com/pd/Vincent-Van-Gogh-The-Ambiguity-of-Insanity-Audiobook/B07MDHN94P

iTunes – https://itunes.apple.com/audiobook/vincent-van-gogh-the-ambiguity-of-insanity-unabridged/id1448055688

Webtoon Wednesdays: Let’s Play Webtoon Review

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This Webtoon Wednesday is less of a review and more of me just talking about a Webtoon I started reading yesterday. I instantly fell in love with it, but I am only about 5 chapters in. Half of the characters in the picture above I haven’t even met in the Webtoon yet!

Sam is a game developer, and she was originally proud of her first puzzle-adventure game Ruminate. She spent hours and hours on it and was so happy when it had been given positive reviews on the indie game site she published it on. Then a Youtuber named Marshall gave her game a bad review online. He didn’t even read the instructions, got frustrated when he couldn’t get past the game, and ended the video trying to give “criticism” to the game’s developer. His fans then went and review-bombed Sam’s profile on the site until it was taken down for having such a high volume of negative reviews at one time. Then, Marshall moves in next door, and Sam has to figure out how she is going to deal with the neighbor that basically ruined her life.

I love how this comic represents people with social anxiety. Sam didn’t break down meeting Marshall, but then she had a panic/asthma attack with her friends when she was thinking about how to live next to him all the time.

This comic also talks about being a Youtuber or an indie game dev. Marshall had to be up all hours of the night, even when he was tired, just to make content for his viewers. Even when he was tired he would put on a happy face just to try to put out content on a regular basis. Sam put a lot of time and effort into her project, but one big Youtuber getting the wrong idea about her game, and her career was just about ruined in an instant. Review bombed and the original ratings might never return. I have never heard of this happening to someone who actually didn’t do something wrong in the gaming community (like a Youtuber calling out a developer for being a racist or bad to his employees or something), but I am sure that it has happened. I am glad that Mongie, the author, is bringing light to these important issues.

I am not going to give a rating as I am not very far in the episodes, but I will update you all on my final rating in a different post once I am completely caught up. Thanks for reading!

Rambling about Into the Spiderverse (With Spoilers!)

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This has honestly been the greatest animated film that I have ever seen. That’s the one thing that I want to make clear in this review. The art in this movie is absolutely stunning. Sometimes I had to remind myself that I was watching an animated film and not a live-action movie. The characters just seemed so alive. They all had their own personalities, their own personal quirks, and this was shown both through the voice acting and the animation. Each character had their own way of speaking, moving, and interacting with the other characters on screen.

To be honest, I haven’t read many of the comics, so I wasn’t sure how old Miles was supposed to be. When I found out after seeing the film that he was supposed to be 13 I thought that the age fit him, but to be honest, anywhere between 12 and 15 could have fit him. He goes to a private boarding middle school in NYC, away from all his friends, and he is extremely smart. One of my favorite parts of the movie was when he cheated his way into getting a failing grade by figuring out what the right answers were just so he could put the wrong ones down and try to fail out of the school. The teacher caught on and assured him that he would eventually fit in at his school and that he just needed to give it time.

What I thought was a little strange at first was how he didn’t talk to his roommate at all. We don’t even get the roommates name, they just completely avoid each other in the tiny dorm room. This didn’t seem realistic to me, especially for 13-year-old guys. From what I’ve seen, most 13-year-olds instantly make friends with each other at day camps and that sort of thing, and I’m sure that the school would have had icebreakers on the first day. Even my COLLEGE had icebreakers. I feel like there was originally going to be a scene about this that was deleted so I will be waiting for the deleted scenes to be released and see.

I LOVED Miles’ relationship with his uncle. His uncle was so cool and supported his art. He DID kinda bring a 13-year-old kid into some sort of abandoned subway service area to graffiti, which wasn’t the best idea, but he was supportive. He was like the cool older brother to Miles who only had his strict and not very emotionally available policeman father. I was absolutely CRUSHED when he turned out to be helping Kingpin. That scene where Miles was hiding in the apartment and listening to his uncle talk to Kingpin, I was just shocked. That scene had me nervous and I was just watching it! And then he found out that he had been fighting his nephew the whole time and got killed for it. I may have hated what the uncle was doing, but he didn’t deserve to die, and this hurt the family so much.

I also think that they did the romance well in this movie. Since Miles is supposed to be so young, he doesn’t have any relationship experience. He likes Gwen and his uncle tries to give him advice, but he ends up just ruining everything anyways. Then she turns out to be a Spider Person from another universe, and they decide to just stay friends. This was way better, as having a 13-year-old relationship scene would have just been awkward. They have future movies to start being romantic if they decide to be romantic at all.

I also loved that we got to see different Spiderpeople. Gwen was a female Spiderwoman, then we had a Spiderpig, and SpiderNoir from the 1920s, and a grown SpiderMan, and then a Japanese Spiderwoman. The movie wasn’t just about a “black Spiderman.” It was about everyone seeing themselves in the mask, saving their own communities and universes. And this was so cool!

The only thing I wish we had seen was more of Miles in action! He is just figuring himself out for most of the movie, so we only see a few of his Spidermanning skills put to good use. Most of the time he is accidentally getting stuck to buildings or to Gwen’s hair, rather than actually doing stuff “on command.” This is definitely a more realistic portrayal of a superhero, as it doesn’t make sense that you get powers and all of a sudden know how to make a suit and web-shooters and stuff. But I can’t wait for the sequel to see how he will be when he has full control over his powers.

I’ll admit, this movie is rather dark for a PG film. Yes, Into the Spiderverse is PG! I personally think it could have been PG13, as the scene with Peter Parker’s death is really dark. You literally see Peter on the ground, in pain, and then the giant KingPin just slams his fists down on his body, instantly killing him. I mean, there’s no blood, but that was still pretty intense. Plus Miles’ uncle is shot right in front of him. Comparing this to another PG film like Frozen or Finding Dory, and you see how this is a bit more intense. Parents still take their little kids to see PG13 Marvel movies, so nothing would change. But if you have a sensitive child, this might not be the movie for you. I cried for hours at Baloo’s death in Jungle Book when I was like 5 or 6, no way I would have been able to handle this one as a little kid.

The scene where they were transporting all the different Spiders back to their own universes was so intense. I felt as if I was in some sort of light show, there was just so much going on. The universes were colliding with each other so there were colors all over the place, and then there were different enemies that needed to be defeated. I don’t know how long it took to animate that one scene, but it was more intense than any other part of the film. And it came out beautifully. I can’t wait to rewatch the movie when it comes out on Netflix just to see that one scene!

I would recommend this movie to anyone looking for an amazing Marvel animated film.

Overall Rating: 6 out of 5 paintbrushes

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